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Law School Interview Questions and Answers

Law Application & Interview Preparation Specialists

Interviews for law school can require a breadth of knowledge and attributes, covering your personal experiences, your views of the field and its challenges, your knowledge of the career, and more. Here, we present 10 questions and answers suitable for candidates to top law schools in the UK or US.

Understanding of and Motivation for Law

What qualities should lawyers have?

All lawyers will rely on certain attributes, or qualities. I believe that core amongst these attributes are being professional, being organised, being able to solve problems, having integrity, and being hard-working. Being professional should be apparent – it is a challenging vocation that requires excellent behaviour when interacting with clients, the firm, or indeed with firms retained by other parties.In order to succeed, you will need to be organised, as there will be a significant amount of work, deadlines, meetings, etc.

Problem-solving will see you able to work quickly and efficiently, and deal with issues as they arise. Integrity goes hand-in-hand with professionalism – you will need integrity to take on deals with clients and remain impartial, maintain confidentiality, not act on particular information, etc. Lastly, you will need to be hard-working – willing to put in long hours when required, and go above and beyond the call of duty. 

What aspects of your law degree are you most excited for?

I’m really excited for the shared sense of community amongst law students, which I believe is especially present here, with the high regard that the Law Society is held in. I look forward to being able to share my interest and passion with others. Equally, the fact that the learning I will do can be applied to real world situations is of interest – it means that I will be able to debate my learning not just with those studying Law, but also friends from other courses.

For example, debating affirmative action policies could involve friends studying humanities courses or indeed any other subject – but my legal knowledge could prove useful in centring the debate. I’m also really interested in the pro bono schemes that I will be able to undertake – I know that this university is well known for linking its students with lawyers who do robust pro bono work in the immigration sector. Lastly, the opportunity to research on behalf of pro bono schemes is also hugely compelling and something that I wish to become involved with as I move into the second half of my law degree. 

How have you researched what it’s like to study Law?

I’ve researched both studying law and the legal profession extensively. In particular, I’ve found the following to be really useful for understanding what studying law is like:

– Reading the ‘big’ works on law that are designed to prepare those without knowledge of law to the subject, like About Law and The Rule of Law

– Reading students’ accounts of what it’s like to study at different universities, across different types of site and social media – from official university sites, to YouTube, to personal blogs that go into much greater detail

– Consulting different university’s sites to gather as much insight as possible into what they expect from their respective students, and what their courses are like

– Looking at the common outcomes expected of Law students, and how they are prepared for the SQE through their courses

– Speaking to students who are either currently studying, or have studied, Law. In particular, I’ve spoken to various alumni of this university, as well as a range of second and third year students. I believe that they have given me an accurate overview.

Techniques, Tutorials & Past Law Interview Questions & Model Answers

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Personal Qualities & Attributes

Have you ever faced particular difficulties whilst working in a team?

I faced particular difficulties whilst working as part of a team for a project in my final year of school. The teams were allotted randomly, and my team of four had two students who were highly unmotivated. It was vital to the team’s success that each team member put effort in, as we each had one domain that we had to handle – this was determined by the teacher. I was able to cover my own domain efficiently. However, I tried to organise check-ins where we worked together and updated each other, and the two less-motivated students did not attend. They also did not reply to messages. I therefore had to wait until our next lesson, which they were absent from. I spoke to each student in private to ask them whether they were working on the project, and whether I could help them. It transpired that one student was having a very difficult time in their personal life, and I empathised with them. We were able to develop a plan together to deal with the situation. However, the other student was simply lacking motivation and made little effort to collaborate with me. I therefore asked them to speak to the teacher to explain that they were not inputting to the project. They refused. I therefore informed them that I would speak to the tutor on their behalf, as I had no other choice. I did this, and the teacher was understanding. We divided their domain up between the other three of us. 

What would you do if you fell behind on your work here?

I would want to understand why I’m falling behind before I take any further action. I would therefore assess whether it is due to a problem on my part, whether it is due to a lack of teaching, whether the work is simply incredibly difficult, etc. I would then take this information and act on it as appropriate. If the falling behind is due to me, is it because I am not balancing my work well enough? Am I not spending enough time learning outside of university? I would need to be honest with myself and act where appropriate. I would also speak to a tutor for help, be it a problem on my part or not. I would seek their advice on how to proceed. I would also speak to fellow students about how they handle the work. If needed, I would seek support from friends and confide in them to make sure that I was feeling alright outside of work.

When have you demonstrated an ability to solve problems?

During my final year of school I was part of a project group that had to meet three times a week. However, the project was poorly organised by my school and we therefore normally had other commitments at the times when we were supposed to meet, as well as varied timetables that made other times throughout the week very difficult. I therefore proposed to the other three on the team that we modernise and streamline our approach. We switched to an online platform to edit the project on which we could easily see feedback and comments, and edit in real-time. We moved from in-person meetings to three Zoom meetings spread throughout the week that we were able to arrange much more easily. I also drove us to separate the project into components that we each took ownership of, to make it easier to work independently. This led to us being able to complete the project efficiently without having to meet in-person as was previously needed. 

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Work Experience & Working with Others

Why do you think you will succeed as a lawyer?

There are four principal factors that underlie my faith that I can succeed as a lawyer. They are, in order of importance: 

– My analytical ability. I’ve always found taking significant amounts of information and analysing it, then presenting it to others, to be both enjoyable and relatively straightforward 

– My dedication and work ethic. Throughout school I’ve been an incredibly hard worker, both in terms of academia and my extracurricular activities

– My ability to articulate my thoughts, both in written communication and verbally. I am able to argue and debate coherently and efficiently, and equally structure written communication or essays concisely

– My strong communication and team working skills. I am an able team player and leader, as is evidenced by my range of leadership positions and the number of teams on which I play at school

What kinds of things give you the most satisfaction in your work?

I find that work with some form of tangible impact is the most satisfying – that needn’t be something particularly pronounced, but it can be anything rather – and in fact this is a great way of motivating oneself. For example, if I were to outline that I derive satisfaction from helping others through the work that I do – like volunteering for charity, derive satisfaction from performing to the best of my ability – excelling an exam, for example, and derive satisfaction from knowing that my work has improved me or others to some extent, then I can take this knowledge and use it. For example, if I’m revising, I might take extra time to make accurate, detailed and attractive notes on a particular subject, allowing both me and my friends the chance to learn a subject better, thus helping myself and others, creating something tangible, and improving myself in the process. 

What type of responsibilities have you had in prior work experiences outside law?

My main experience of work has been through charity and volunteering work. The roles that I have had have involved working in charity shops and alongside fellow volunteers in public-facing roles, often speaking to people and describing the work that we are doing in order to bring attention to the charity. Examples include:

Volunteering in a British Heart Foundation store – here I had to speak to customers and help them with queries about the store, handle purchases, and also help the more elderly volunteers with physical tasks like moving boxes around. Responsibilities were therefore empathising and communicating with customers, communicating and working with other team members, and ensuring the smooth running of the shop when I was running it independently.

Volunteering for Mind – here I took charge of a team of fellow young volunteers, and we were tasked with speaking to the public and trying to bring attention to the charity. Responsibilities included managing the team, solving disputes between team members, and interacting with the public to promote the charity

Have you ever faced particular difficulties whilst working in a team?


I faced particular difficulties whilst working as part of a team for a project in my final year of school. The teams were allotted randomly, and my team of four had two students who were highly unmotivated. It was vital to the team’s success that each team member put effort in, as we each had one domain that we had to handle – this was determined by the teacher. I was able to cover my own domain efficiently. However, I tried to organise check-ins where we worked together and updated each other, and the two less-motivated students did not attend. They also did not reply to messages. I therefore had to wait until our next lesson, which they were absent from. I spoke to each student in private to ask them whether they were working on the project, and whether I could help them. It transpired that one student was having a very difficult time in their personal life, and I empathised with them. We were able to develop a plan together to deal with the situation. However, the other student was simply lacking motivation and made little effort to collaborate with me. I therefore asked them to speak to the teacher to explain that they were not inputting to the project. They refused. I therefore informed them that I would speak to the tutor on their behalf, as I had no other choice. I did this, and the teacher was understanding. We divided their domain up between the other three of us.

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