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BMAT Results (Historical information & stats)

Advice & Insight From BMAT Specialists

BMAT results are not judged in terms of pass or fail. Scores are allocated in accordance to achievement. Whether this score is enough to attain entry to a preferred university is dependent upon the individual requirements of the institution.

While universities such as Oxford and Cambridge do not have specific cut off points, there is a historical correlation in offer thresholds that serves as a guide to the kinds of scores with which an applicant can expect an invitation to interview or an offer of placement. While emphasis is placed on the average scores of applicants for a particular year, there are general scores which can indicate a good chance of qualification. Oxford University, for example, usually offers interviews to applicants with score bands of 5 and above for sections 1 and 2 and offers placements to those with 6 or above. 

To see how achievable these scores are, we can extrapolate consistency in score achievement for sections 1 and 2 by comparing results year on year. Let’s begin by looking at the results for section 1 since 2015.

Section 1 Results 2015 - 2020

In 2015, 23% of applicants scored between 5.2 and 5.9 and around 12% of applicants achieved 6 or above. This means around 35% of applicants achieved the required section 1 scores for consideration by Oxford university.

The following year, 2016, 22% of applicants scored from 5.2 to 5.9 with 18% scoring above 6. 

In 2017, 31% of applicants scored between 5 and 6 and 12% scored 6 or above.

In 2018, 22% of applicants scored between 5 and 6 and 8% were above 6.

In 2019, 24% of applicants scored between 5 and 6 and 11% were above 6.

In 2020, 25% of applicants scored between 5 and 6 and 14% were above 6.

We can see from these results that a university like Oxford would accept the top third of section 1 applicants into the next stage of their recruitment process.

Section 2 Results 2015 - 2020

Moving on to section 2, in 2015 we can see a similar pattern as 20% of learners achieved between 5.2 to 5.9 and around 10% achieved 6 or above. This makes for around 30% gaining required scores for entry to the next stage.

In 2016, 23% scored from 5 to 6 and around 15% scored 6 or above.

 In 2017, 27% scored from 5 to 6 and around 17% scored 6 or above.

In 2018, 28% scored from 5 to 6 and around 11% scored 6 or above.

In 2019, 20% scored from 5 to 6 and around 10% scored 6 or above.

In 2020, 23% scored from 5 to 6 and around 15% scored 6 or above.

Again, the figures for the last five years run a similar pattern with the top third being a good marker to progress to the next stage in their application.

Looking at scores of above 6 in both sections 1 and 2, a learner would have to be in the top 15% of applicants for their year to consider themselves in with a chance of an offer of placement.

Section 3 Results 2015 - 2020

Unlike the computer algorithms used to mark sections 1 and 2, section 3 is marked by two examiners. There are two categories of scoring in section 3: Quality of Content, which is scored from 1 to 5, and Quality of English, which is scored from A to E. 5A is the highest possible score for this section. We can examine historical scores for both categories to see how achievable this score is and to extrapolate guidelines for future applicants.

In 2015, 1% of applicants scored 5 in Quality of Content while over 75% scored A for Quality of English. This indicates that it is far easier to attain a top score for English than it is for Content and this also seen in subsequent years.

In 2016, 1% of applicants scored 5 in Quality of Content while over 85% scored A for Quality of English.

In 2017, 1% of applicants scored 5 in Quality of Content while over 80% scored A for Quality of English.

In 2018, 1% of applicants scored 5 in Quality of Content while over 75% scored A for Quality of English.

In 2019, again 1% of applicants scored 5 in Quality of Content while 75% scored A for Quality of English.

In 2020, 1% of applicants scored 5 in Quality of Content while over 73% scored A for Quality of English.

In the past five years, the overwhelming amount of applicants scored 3 in their Quality of Content category. It accounted for over 30% of applicant scores every year. This would make 3A the most common result for section 3 in the past five years. Only 1% of applicants have scored 5A since 2015.

It is worth noting that results for section 3 do not carry the same weighting for universities as sections 1 and 2. Oxford gives them a 20% value, half that of sections 1 and 2. Cambridge university colleges also place emphasis on the results of the first two sections, consistently offering placements to applicants with scores of 6 and above.

Looking at recent years, we can see that while a BMAT learner would require scores to place them at least in the top 30% of applicants, these scores are certainly attainable and indicate a strong possibility of acceptance to some of the top medical courses in the world.

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